Secrecy

When Reform Meets Reality in Washington DC

On Day One, U.S. President Barack Obama signed two executive orders. One restored the presumption of disclosure under the Freedom of Information Act, unless "forseeable harm" would result; made presidential records more accessible; and limited claims of executive privilege over information.

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Corporations Bottle Up Their Water Conference

The "Corporate Water Footprinting" conference in San Francisco December 2 and 3 had a small public component: "a presentation by Nestle on assessing water-related risks in communities, Coca-Cola's aggressive environmental water-neutrality goal, and MillerCoors' plan to use less water to make more beer," reports Amanda Witherell.

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Documents Show Tobacco Industry Conspired Against Airline Smoking Ban

SmokingAn analysis of tobacco industry documents published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ) tells how the German cigarette industry worked to stop Lufthansa, the flagship airline of Germany, from banning sm

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Eli Lilly: Yet Again, One Small Step Ahead of Congress

Cartoon doctorThe pharmaceutical company Eli Lilly has announced that it will begin reporting its payments to doctors in late 2009, using an online database. But the disclosure is limited to payments of more than $500 made for giving talks or advice to the company; payments for other services or gifts will not be included. Payments made before 2009 will also not be disclosed.

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Bolivia: The Spies Who Spun Me

In Bolivia, anti-government protests have led to dozens of deaths. President Evo Morales claimed the United States is supporting the violent groups and asked U.S. Ambassador Philip Goldberg to leave. The Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR), pointing to earlier reports that the U.S.

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